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MISTICA: Buenos Aires/GCN2001: Internet radio panel

From: Daniel Pimienta (pimienta@funredes.org)
Date: Mon Dec 03 2001 - 18:50:01 AST


>Date: Sun, 02 Dec 2001 10:01:03 -0500
>From: Garth Graham <garth.graham@sympatico.ca>
>To: gcndotforce@vcn.bc.ca
>Subject: [GCNDotForce] Internet radio of GCN2001 panel
>
>Announcing a demo of grassroots audio streaming (Internet Radio) of a
>panel. Please do forward this to anyone who might be interested
>
>COMMUNITY NETWORKS AND GLOBALIZATION: STRATEGIC OPTIONS
>REDES COMUNITARIAS Y GLOBALIZACIÓN. OPCIONES ESTRATEGICAS.
>
>A Plenary Session Panel At the Global Community Networks Congress (GCN2001)
>in Buenos Aires, December 5, 15.30- 17.30 pm, Eastern Standard Time (i.e.
>an hour ahead of Toronto or New York)
>
>Thanks to Fred Campbell, a specialist in participatory grassroots
>communications working primarily in Atlantic Canada <ryakuga@web.net>, and
>with support from IDRC, this panel will be radio web cast. Fred will be
>working with several representatives of Argentine rural community radio
>associations.
>
>The interface page for the panel web cast is at:
>http://www.ryakuga.org/argentina
>
>The method is “highly compressed QuickTime audio.” This works by streaming
>a 12 kps signal to a streaming server. People with low bandwidth (more than
>12kps) and dialup connections can type in a URL, go to a web page, and pick
>up the signal off the streaming server. The software currently requires
>QT4, not QT5, the latest version. You can download this from the website.
>Installing QT4 may be the trickiest part so, if you haven’t got it you
>should do this in advance. Then, on the day of the panel, it only requires
>going to the page and clicking on the “globe.”
>
>The web site also has a discussion board. You are welcome to post comments
>or questions on either the audio web casting method or the Panel content to
>that board.
>
>Rural Newfoundland is recognized worldwide as being a birthplace of one
>stream of community media - grassroots participatory communication. From
>the 1960s to 1991, this process was facilitated by Memorial University's
>rural extension service and evolved from mobile film crews to developing
>the capacity of rural people to make their own television programming.
>Following the termination of the extension service in 1991, the process has
>largely been facilitated by Ryakuga Grassroots Communication with the
>support of the Community Education Network and the Long Range Regional
>Economic Development Board.
>
>Currently these partners (and 21 others) are engaged in Sharing Our Future,
>an initiative which supports a local process of community dialogue and
>cultural celebration in 12 communities while utilizing internet technology
>for networking and reaching out to expatriate Newfoundlanders. A technical
>barrier worked on by Ryakuga for the past two years has been how to
>simulcast the local, remote community broadcasts on the Internet without
>expensive technology. Originally using beta software and emerging
>technology, the problems have been solved and Sharing Our Future community
>forums are routinely broadcast as internet radio using a personal computer
>with a dialup modem. The convergence of community media and community
>networks on the east coast is grounded in the evolution of participatory
>grassroots communication.
>
>Fred comes to Buenos Aires having just completed two days of intensive
>simulcasting with community groups in Newfoundland. In summarizing the
>results he notes, “I'm sure just about all the community groups in the area
>got their message out. I'm not sure quite how to say it, but it seems to be
>very much of an organic process with gardening metaphors - it will grow and
>we'll do our best to nurture, but it's also out of our control. Sort of
>like having kids, I guess.”
>
>Garth Graham
>Panel Moderator



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